New Show – Harmony Singing in Roots Music

April 13, 2016 | By

Harmony Singing is our latest addition to the weekly schedule at FolkNRoots Radio.

Harmony is a huge part of the appeal of a great deal of roots music.

Whether we are talking about the harmonies of back up vocals, groups which carefully craft multi-part harmonies as part of their general approach, or groups which completely structure their music around 2, 3 or 4 part harmonies, harmony singing is enormously appealing to the human ear.

The Bros Landreth are a Canadian band out of Winnipeg, Manitoba, and they describe their music as “blood harmony and slide guitar”.

 

The Milk Carton Kids are a guitar and vocal duo from California, who were introduced to me as ‘Simon and Garfunkel meet The Everly Brothers‘. However one chooses to describe the music, vocal harmony is an essential component of what they do.

 

Trent Severn are a vocal trio from Stratford, Ontario, who refer to what they do as ‘Canadian history in harmony‘ Although they are all accomplished instrumentalists, the heart of their music is carefully crafted three part harmony.

 

Phillip Henry and Hannah Martin are a folk duo from England. Their music is squarely in the mode of traditional UK folk music, with influences from American country and Old Timey music, especially with regard to instrumentation.

Vocally, they take turns with the lead vocals, supporting each other with well chosen harmonies, interspersed throughout a song.

 

Larry Campbell and Teresa Williams are an Country/Americana duo who harmonize beautifully on many, if not all of their songs. Occasionally they will make multi part harmony the absolute core of an arrangement as with this cover of the Grateful Dead tune, “Attics of My Life”.

 

These are just a few examples of the music you can expect to hear when you tune into our newest show, Harmony Singing, on FolkNRoots Radio which runs Tuesday and Thursday from 9-10 pm and Saturday and Sunday from 9-10am.

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